Tag Archives: lisa belkin

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

On occasional Fridays, I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogsphere:

1. I  begin this week with two moving tributes  in the aftermath of this week’s tragedy at the Boston Marathon. Here is Lisa Belkin of The Huffington Post talking about how we collectively deal with these sorts of terrorist attacks.

2. And here is Cecilia of the Only You blog talking about what the city of Boston means to her.

3. If, like me, you loved Roger Ebert, then you’ll love this obituary by Gene Weingarten in The Washington Post.

4. The fantabulous David Sedaris weighs in on what it’s like to buy a stuffed owl in London.

5. If you need a laugh this week – and honestly, who doesn’t? – kindly check out this hilarious set of responses to “Can someone photoshop the sun between my fingers?”

6. Finally, for those who crave that “coffee house” atmosphere when we work, check out Coffitivity.

 

Have a great weekend!

 

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

On Friday, I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. In case, like me, you’re still missing the Olympics, I give you Mo Farah Running Away From Things.

2. I loved this essay by James Gleick about the rise of autocorrect.

3. From The Huffington Post’s Lisa Belkin, a lovely meditation on parenting.

4. Well, I’ve lived in London for 6 years and I’ve never heard of #5, but otherwise, this BBC America piece on 10 Things Brits Say…And What Americans Think We Mean is right on the money.

5. Finally, if you’re a Tim Minchin fan – and even if you’re not – have a listen to this fabulous interview with the barefooted, piano-playing comedian on BBC Radio 4. He is surprisingly astute about comedy, fame and agnosticism.

 

Have a great weekend, everyone!

 

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. In honor of the late, great Nora Ephron, Huffington Post showcased some of her funniest clips. Huffpo also ran this terrific tribute to Ephron  by Lisa Belkin.

2. If you like Aaron Sorkin, you’ll love Sorkinisms.

3. Sick of annoying cat videos on the internet? Me too. But News Cat Gifs! is a riot, especially if you’re a journalist.

4. Kindly check out my new favorite comic, xkcd. Hit “random” and thank me later.

5. I thought that Mapping European Stereotypes really nailed it. My personal fave? Europe according to Britain.

6. Finally, I loved these illustrations of unusual and rarely spoken words. (Hat tip: 37 Days)

Have a great weekend!

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. I’ll listen to author Anne Lamott talk about anything. Here’s an interview with her at the New York Times Motherlode blog where, among other things, she discusses her views on adulthood. Bliss.

2. Simon Doonan’s random meditation on why we really get tattoos over on Slate is hilarious.

3. Here’s a gorgeous graphic comparison of New York and Paris at The Guardian.

4. I really can’t say for sure why I was mesmerized by the Children Medieval Band performing a song about overdosing on drugs, other than my no longer latent obsession with Game of Thrones. Check out that drummer – wow!

5. Strangling My Muse had some terrific suggestions for how to mark World Creativity and Innovation week. I’m personally a big fan of the community story idea.

6. Via The Huffington Post’s Lisa Belkin, I’ve just discovered The Bloggess. Boy, does she look like fun…

Have a great weekend!

 

 

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. If you do nothing else this weekend, listen to this fascinating account at This American Life of a recent story on China they ran which turned out not to be (entirely) true. Kudos to them for owning this.

2. Over on The Washington Post’s She The People blog, here’s a sobering reminder by Diana Reese of why the whole contraception debate raging in the U.S. isn’t all that important when you don’t have a job.

3. I loved the essay entitled Erma Bombeck: Feminist Housewife by Kristen Levithan on Literary Mama. Such an inspiration for us all.

4. I also loved Lisa Belkin’s account at The Huffington Post of her interview with author Anne Lamott and Lamott’s son, Sam. Sam became a father at 19 and has now written about the experience with his mother. Can’t wait to read it!

5. Also on The Washington Post this week were snippets from the Things I Would Have Said book project. Marvelous!

6. Finally, this is fun: a video of Lego Tower Bridge time lapse construction on Londontopia. Cool!

 

Have a great weekend, everybody!

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading for the weekend:

1. In case you missed it, Mona Simpson’s eulogy for her brother, Steve Jobs, was absolutely breathtaking.

2. One of my favorite parenting bloggers – Lisa Belkin (formerly of Motherlode) – has a new home at The Huffington Post. Here’s one of her provocative, early posts on her new Huffpo blog, Parentlode, on whether we’re actually preparing our children well for the future.

3. Sam Leith has an absolutely fascinating piece in Slate on the history of the meme.

4. Aspiring novelists like myself will be deeply inspired by Leslie Pietrzyk’s story of how she came to write and publish her first novel. (Hat tip: Practicing Writing)

5. Finally, academics will get a huge kick out of this visual quiz – courtesy of a University of Toronto student -  appropriately titled: Prof or Hobo? (Thanks, Jane!)

Have a great weekend!

Over-Parenting: We're All Getting It Wrong

There’s been lots of chatter this week in response to Lisa Belkin’s Sunday Times article announcing the end of “over-parenting.”

Her basic point is that after more than a decade of fetishizing, second-guessing and micro-managing our parenting, we seem to have hit a new phase marked by slow parenting, bad parenting and free-range parenting. Even the once sacrosanct area of breastfeeding is now open to question.

And at least some people are cheering this news.

For some, like Salon’s Amy Benfer, the so-called helicopter parenting trend fostered competition between kids of affluent parents while ignoring the basic needs of the rest.

For others, like Free Range Blogger Lenore Skenazy, over-parenting  infantalized adults while at the same time rendering them nervous wrecks.

I know that at least one friend of mine will be jumping up and down with joy. This mother of three recently wrote me a note saying that while she objects to book burning in principle, she’d make an exception for What To Expect When You’re Expecting…in fact she’d host the barbecue in her own back yard.

I myself will own up to having read the odd parenting manual over the past eight and a half years. I’ve also indulged in the occasional bad parent essay.

But the single best piece of parenting advice I ever got came from my first pediatrician. I went into his office one day stressing out for the 695th time about something I was sure I was doing wrong with my (then) newborn son.  He looked me in the eye and said, “Of course you’re doing it wrong! We all are. We just won’t know it for another 50 years.”

I liked this advice so much that I asked my husband if, God forbid, something horrible should ever befall him, he’d be OK with me marrying this guy. He said yes. Unfortunately, I made the mistake of telling this to the good Doctor, who wisely responded: “OK, but we better not tell my wife.”

*****

Love the Life section at Salon.com. I’m a regular.

Image: Mommy Sandwich – Week 2 my kids and me by Photogra Tree via Flickr under a Creative Commons License.

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Kaleidoscope Careers: Uncovering Your Inner Cezanne

Soon after I started this blog, I got an email from a former colleague who was quite taken with the RealDelia concept. “Think about it,” he said. “You have so much material. I mean how many shows are there featuring ex-pat American PhD freelance essayist ex-radio producer moms?”

He was teasing me, of course (he also said that I should have called the blog “Lloyds of London,” but then advised me to save that for the reality TV show). But he does touch on a serious point. Like many people out there in today’s work force, I’ve done a lot of different things in my professional life which, combined, give me a diverse set of experiences to write about and talk about.

Lisa Belkin had a terrific article about this phenomenon in the New York Times Magazine earlier this year, in which she discussed Caroline Kennedy’s failed bid for the New York senate seat vacated by Hillary Clinton. However you felt about Kennedy as a candidate, Belkin’s basic point was that Kennedy may have lacked experience for the job in a linear-I’ve-been-preparing-for-this-job-all-my-life sort of way (unlike, say, Kristen Gillebrand, who eventually got the nod). But the sort of “kaleidoscope” resume that Kennedy brought to the table (e.g., lawyer, writer, fundraiser, parent) is increasingly the norm in today’s economy, a by-product both of the dot-com economy which threw traditional career trajectories out the window, as well as the reality of women returning to the workforce after having children.

Belkin’s article also reminded me of some of the arguments raised in Malcolm Gladwell’s latest book, Outliers. In a New Yorker article last Fall entitled “Late Bloomers: Why do we Equate Genius with Precocity?,” Gladwell – drawing on extensive research by David Galenson at the University of Chicago – points out that many of the world’s most celebrated “geniuses” – people like Paul Cezanne, to name but one – didn’t start out as geniuses right off the bat, but rather took years to culivate their talents. So it wasn’t that Cezanne was discovered late (as is sometimes erroneously thought to be the case); it’s that he simply wasn’t very good at what he did until quite late in his career. In the meantime, he was experimenting.

Taken together, I found the messages in these articles to be quite reassuring. Belkin’s article suggests that the economy may be changing in ways that rewards diversity over continuity where careers are concerned. And Gladwell’s article suggests that if you haven’t been labeled a genius by the time you’re twenty five, you’ve still got plenty of time ahead of you. In either case, the message seems to be:  experiment away…

*****

While we’re on the topic of experimentation, I took my kids to see Dan Zane and Friends today in London. Some of you may remember Zanes from his earlier career in the pop band The Del Fuegos. But he has since reinvented himself as a creator of  “homemade family music.” Haven’t seen him perform live? It’s a must…

Image: Kaleidoscope FR 5340 1907 by Lucy Nieto via Flickr under a Creative Commons License.

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