Tag Archives: McSweeneys

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. I don’t know about you folks actually living through the 2012 presidential campaign in America, but it sure is fun to watch from the sidelines. Check out Rick Perry’s “Strong” ad campaign and The Partisans: Rick Perry – Weak, man response.

2. All week long, The Guardian has been running a fascinating series analyzing the causes of this summer’s riots in London. Here’s a really neat interactive post on how rumors about the riots spread on Twitter.

3. As always, Joan Wickersham has a fabulous meditation in The Boston Globe on connectedness and human nature (via Charles Dickens.)

4. And speaking of literature, I’m absolutely loving Lisa Belkin’s Parentlode blog over at The Huffington Post. This is a recent, highly-trafficked post she did on Children’s Books Parents Either Love or Hate and a companion piece along the lines of  “if your child liked reading X, he or she will also like reading Y.” (BTW, do some people really not like The Runaway Bunny? I’m shocked. Shocked!)

5. From the ever-arch McSweeneys, I give you excerpts from steamy romance novels for parents of young children.

6. Two fascinating, holiday-themed fact sheets: from the Los Angeles times, the history of Christmas Carol lyrics. (I always wondered what “wassailing” meant.) And from my brother (!) at the New York Public Library, how (and when!) to buy a diamond. (Well, OK, it’s Christmas-themed for some of us…)

7. And finally, this week’s LOL award goes to Dahlia Lithwick’s essay on how Jews deal with Christmas specials, appropriately titled: Oy, Hark!

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. I always love reading Katy Keim’s suggestions over at Book Snob. This week, she had a terrific post on why we all need to read that “Great American Novel” Freedom by Jonathan Franzen.

2.  What would Ayn Rand do? Here’s some deliciously wry child-rearing advice from Eric Hague over at McSweeneys.

3. If you’re in need of a laugh, have a look at The Onion’s spot on the new, FDA-approved depressant drug for the Annoyingly Cheerful.

4. Also sure to bring a smile is Alex Beam’s rant against (pretty much all) drivers in The Boston Globe.

5. Bibliophiles will adore  Save The Words, a website that allows you to adopt words that risk being dropped from the English language. (Snollygoster, anyone?) (Hat tip: Mary Murphy’s Reading blog)

6. Finally, for those who are interested, here’s a post I did earlier this week for Politics Daily on 10 Reasons To Lift The Cuba Embargo.

I will be doing a staycation in London next week with the kids. I’ll see you all on the other side of August (sometimes known as September!)

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Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you to some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. As someone who’s been pondering middle age quite a bit lately (here and here), I was quite taken with this post by Raina Kelley at Newsweek where she lays out some mid-life crisis rules to live by. (Note to self: No naked skyping!)

2. If you’re a mom, a wife or both, be sure to check out this CafeMom quiz that lets you rank yourself as a parent and a spouse. (Hat tip: Motherlode)

3. I laughed out loud at his essay in McSweeneys where the author writes from the perspective of life as a comic sans font. Hilarious! (Hat tip: Writer Abroad) Also in McSweeneys, Eloise (of story book fame) turns 23. (Hat tip: Communicatrix)

4. Writers will wince in recognition at this arch  blog by a literary agent entitled SlushPileHell, where the agent lists – and then disses – the kinds of claims authors make in their cover letters. Ouch! (Hat tip: Lisa Romeo Writes)

5. A new (to me) blog on creativity which a thoughtful reader pointed me towards: Strangling My Muse.

6. Finally, I really enjoyed this essay in the Brown Alumni Monthly by Jamie Metzl on the perils of wikipedia fame.

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Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere.

This week, however, I’m going to do things a bit differently. I’m still going to recommend some things for you to look at, but one’s a book, one’s a newspaper and one’s a radio program. (Every once in awhile it’s fun to shake things up…):

1. The Happiness Project (the book)- I’ve often mentioned Gretchen Rubin’s fantabulous blog, The Happiness Project here. Gretchen spent a year test-driving the wisdom of the ages, the current scientific studies, and the lessons from popular culture about how to be happy. Now she’s producing a book on the same topic. The book will come out on December 29, but it can be pre-ordered here. I was lucky enough to read an early draft and I can’t say enough about it…it’s insightful, it’s funny, it’s incredibly wide-ranging and it’s also quite accessible. Plus, it’s a great holiday present for anyone looking to devise – or live up to – all those New Years Resolutions coming your way just around the corner. I know I’ve already got a list of people I plan on giving it to. Please go have a look.

2. San Francisco Panorama - Also on the list of “not-yet-out-must-reads” is Dave Eggers’ forthcoming, one-time-release San Francisco Panorama. Eggers will be familiar to many as the wunderkind who wrote A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, his post-modern memoir of raising his little brother while still barely an adult himself. He’s also the founding editor of McSweeney’s, which will publish Panorama on December 8th. Panorama was inspired by Eggers’ belief that in the age of the internet, we are in serious danger of losing the newspaper as we know it. So as a paean to the broadsheet of yore, he has pulled together journalists, writers, comic strip artists…even kids to recreate that old-fashioned thing we call a newspaper, one more time with feeling. Pre-order here. (Hat Tip: Book Snob.)

3. A National Day of Listening – Finally, if you like family stories (and let’s be honest, who doesn’t?) you should check out Story Corps’ National Day of Listening. The idea behind this project was to get families talking to one another and to preserve those conversations on line for posterity’s sake. Stories will be aired starting today, and you can still go and download your own. As we used to say in radioland, have a listen! (Hat tip: Motherlode.)

*****

Finally, if you live in the U.K. and ever wonder whether Big Brother is watching you, he is. Read all about how the British police are now spying on protesters in my article at PoliticsDaily.com here

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