Tag Archives: melinda henneberger

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

On Fridays, I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. I’ve read a lot of smart analyses of the 2012 presidential race, but few as poignant – and on the money – as this one by my colleague Melinda Henneberger, on why rape shoudn’t be used to score political points.

2. Also timely post-Hurricane Sandy is this retrospective on hilarious wind-blown reporters in The Huffington Post. (Hat tip: Donna Trussell)

3. Is Holden Caufield really passé? Perish the thought! I just gave Catcher in the Rye to my 11 year-old to read…

4. I absolutely adored Kristen’s take on blogging and community, written on the third anniversary of her fantastic blog, Motherese.

5. Finally, in case you’re wondering why I love living in Europe, I give you the spermbullit.

Have a great weekend!

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Apologies if you have not been getting your normal updates from the blog this week. I’ve been having trouble with the feed and am working to resolve this problem. I appreciate your patience.

 

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. Apropos of the burgeoning Herman Cain sex scandal, my colleague Melinda Henneberger offers a detailed account in the Washington Post of the sexual harassment that she, several of our colleagues and random women off of the street have encountered throughout their working lives. It’s why, as she argues, sexual harassment is a ‘real issue’, not something to get past so that we can move on to what really counts. Amen.

2. Proving that he truly is one of the strangest – and funniest – guys out there, here’s a replay of John Hodgman’s speech at the 2008 TED conference, entitled “Aliens, Love – Where Are They?” (Hat tip: Quiet: The Power of Introverts)

3. Surprisingly moving: The New York Times’ Philip Galanes explains why he became a gossip columnist.

4. This American Life fans will adore the Ira Glass Sex Tape which appeared in The Village Voice. Remarkably credible!

5. I was absolutely mesmerized by the Museum of Obsolete Objects. Be sure to check out the entry on the mouse! (Hat tip: Very Short List.)

6. In response to my post earlier this week about why I envy atheists, a friendly reader sent me The Atheist Song by Steve Martin. This is why I love blogging. Thanks, Alex!

7. Finally, your week would not be complete with out a quick peek at this extremely strange German fellow who apparently does not like the term “Daddy Long Legs.’ Kindly drop whatever you’re doing and have a look-see.

 

 

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. Here is an absolutely harrowing, first-person video of the Japanese tsunami. It is almost unwatchable. (Hat tip: @donnatrussell)

2. As I indicated several weeks back, Politics Daily – my (other) Online home for the past two years – has gone dark. Here is our amazing Editor-in-Chief, Melinda Henneberger, in what’s quite possibly the classiest send-off I’ve ever read.

3. And while we’re eulogizing Politics Daily, I loved this behind-the-scenes look by Nate Grady at what was like to be a comment moderator on our political blog.

4. A friend of mine has started a new blog about parenting, expat living and all-around mindfulness called Inhale To Prepare. Here’s one of her debut posts where she applies what she learns from watching her 11-month old explore the world to how we approach the mundane tasks of everyday life. I don’t think I’ll ever floss the same way again.

5. Another new blog out there worth visiting is Susan Cain’s Quiet: The Power Of Introverts. I’m definitely *not* an introvert but I enjoy reading Susan’s meditations on this topic.

6. I read a lot of freelance writing blogs, but few are as consistently useful as Michelle Rafter’s Word Count. If you’re a freelance writer (or wannabe) this one is a must.

7. Finally, in the Department of Just Because, here’s a really cool video over at the Boston Globe’s Brainiac blog explaining  how sounds get made for movies. Love it!

Have a great weekend.

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. I was really moved by my colleague Melinda Henneberger’s tribute to Elizabeth Edwards over at Politics Daily.

2. Equally moving was this tribute by my colleague Mia Navarro to a close friend she lost to AIDS, also at Politics Daily.

3. On the New York Times Motherlode blog, Laura Shumaker tells us about what happens when children go missing.

4. Perhaps because I’ve been beset by flu myself all week, I was really drawn to this account  in the Los Angeles Times by writer Meghan Daum of her recent, inexplicable hospitalization. (Hat tip: Lisa Romeo Writes)

5. Here’s the interview I did with Al Jazeera (English) on the media coverage of Tony Blair and George W. Bush’s memoirs. (Segment starts around 12:20)

6. An odd and inspiring story:  the best-selling song in Germany for the past eight weeks is a cover of “Somewhere Over The Rainbow” by a now deceased, Hawaiian ukelele player named Israel Kamakawiwo’ole. Apparently, the song just keeps on inspiring. Have a listen.

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Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. I was really sorry to miss Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert’s Rally To Restore Sanity and/or Fear in Washington, DC last week.  But I really enjoyed reading this recap of the rally by my colleague Melinda Henneberger over at Politics Daily, as well as watching this video montage of the rally, also at Politics Daily.

2. I was fascinated by this analysis of what your blog/Face book/Twitter profile picture says about you by Nichole Bernier at Beyond The Margins. According to the experts, I am “warm and approachable,” but I also desperately need you to like me.

3. Here’s a great meditation on why 80 is *not* the new 60 by poet  Judith Viorst at wowOwow.

4. And here’s a great post on 16 Things I’ve Learned About Being A Mother by Chris Jordan at Alphamom. Totally with her on the pen thing. (Hat Tip: Motherlode)

5. As a former academic, I laughed out loud at this animated video, “So you want to get a PhD in the Humanities?” Ouch.

6. Finally, in the Department of “Just Because,” check out this video of an octopus that can mimic other animals from the Boston Globe’s Brainiac blog. SO COOL!

Have a great weekend!

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The Gores' Break-Up: Why I'm Not Sad

I think it’s best if I just come out and say this up front: I’m not really sad that Al and Tipper Gore split up.

Yes, I know. I’m an outlier. Nearly everyone I know — and certainly everyone I’m reading — is outright depressed by this separation.

Don’t get me wrong. I think it’s a shame. And it’s a shame because — as my colleague Melinda Henneberger wrote recently — they seemed like a couple who were genuinely in love. Between the 40 years of marriage and the four beautiful kids and the whole high school sweetheart thing and, yes — the kisses — they really looked like they were in it for the long haul.

But somehow, I was much sadder when Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins split up. I was also sadder when — gulp — writer and public radio commentator Sandra Tsing Loh split with her man (and then went on an anti-marriage crusade.)

Why is this?

Read the rest of the article on www.PoliticsDaily.com

Image: But It’s Over Now by Electronic Eye via Flickr under a Creative Commons License

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Why Women Shouldn't Settle For Unhappy Marriages

I’ve been thinking a lot about marriage lately. Or, more precisely: unhappy marriages. And I’m beginning to wonder if it isn’t time for more women to – as we say in politics – “throw the bums out.”

I got to thinking about this after my colleague, Melinda Henneberger, wrote a post last weekend about one of those marriages about which we know just a bit too much: Silda and Elliot Spitzer‘s. You may recall Spitzer as the former Governor of New York who resigned from his job when it was revealed that he’d been patronizing a prostitution service. And you will certainly recall his wife, Silda, who stood next to him as he resigned in what has to go down in history as one of the most painful “stand by your man” performances of all time.

What Melinda zeroes in on is a quote attributed to Silda Spitzer in Peter Elkind’s new book, Rough Justice: The Rise and Fall of Elliot Spitzer. Referring to her husband’s penchant for hookers, Mrs. Spitzer says: “The wife is supposed to take care of the sex. This is my failing. I wasn’t adequate.”

Take a moment to cringe. Please.

And when you’re done, do some reflection. Because we all know plenty of Sildas, don’t we ladies? Strong, confident, loving female friends who dissolve into a pool of self-doubt and self-loathing when their husbands stray or simply fail to live up to their expectations.

Read the rest of this article here

Image: Divorce by jcoterhals via Flickr under a Creative Commons license.

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Why I Could Not Go Back To Catholicism

An old friend of mine recently posted the following sentence on his Facebook page: “I know this is totally not a PC thing to say, but can someone please explain to me why anyone is still Catholic?”

It’s a fair question. And my Politics Daily colleague, Melinda Henneberger, has one answer. In an honest and moving piece she wrote a few days back, Melinda tells us that she’s as put off as the next person by the current sex abuse scandal roiling the Catholic Church, as well as by the Vatican’s latest attempts to play the victim and point fingers. At the end of the day, though, Melinda is going to hang in there with this Church, because being Catholic is integral to who she is. “In the end,” she writes,”it is not about them.”

Today I’m over on PoliticsDaily.com talking about why I’m not convinced by this argument. I explain why – even if I were contemplating re-entering Christianity – I don’t think I could stomach becoming a Catholic right now, despite being raised in an observant Catholic family. And yes, it has everything to do with the current sex abuse scandal.

Drop on by and have a look.

Image: Pope Benedict XVI in Nazi camp in Brezinzka by miqul via Flickr under a Creative Commons license.

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