Tag Archives: Stuff White People Like

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you towards some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to visit a nudist camp (for the record, I haven’t, but now I do), have a look at Emily Yoffe’s account of her vacation at a nudist camp in Slate.

2. If you’ve ever used an internet dating service, you will love Paul Rudnick’s hilarious satire in The New Yorker about www.settlingdownward.com. (Note: subscription may be required to view this post.)

3. And while we’re on the subject of dating, OKCupid has compiled some trends you’ll want to have a look at called The *Real* Stuff White People Like, where they analyze things different ethnic groups like in the United States (by gender). (Sidebar: If you haven’t visited the original Stuff White People Like, do that first.)

4. Here’s a delightfully funny video review of Jonathan Franzen’s new novel Freedom by Washington Post book critic Ron Charles.

5. I would now like to ask you to drop whatever you’re doing and watch this video of the weirdest (and most disturbing) political speech EVER over on Gawker. (Non-American readers: see what you’re missing?)

6. In a more serious political vein, I’ve been absolutely riveted by Jeffrey Goldberg’s series in The Atlantic about his recent meetings with Fidel Castro. Read the first installment here.

7. Finally, here’s my take in www.PoliticsDaily.com on Tony Blair’s complicated legacy – and his incredibly awful book tour.

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you to some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. If you’ve read even one book in Stieg Larsson’s magnificent Millennium Trilogy (e.g. The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo) you will love Nora Ephron’s spoof of Larsson’s series in The New Yorker. (And when you’re done with that, check out my colleague Luisita Lopez Torregrosa’s take on why Lisbeth Salander is the iconic heroine of our age at www.PoliticsDaily.com.)

2. While we’re on the topic of feminist heroines for our age, have a look at Salon’s interview with The Daily Show’s new correspondent Olivia Munn. (Must read if you’ve been following the whole JezebelDaily Show face-off over Munn’s new job.)

3. An old friend of mine has just started a delightfully funny, self-mocking look at what it’s like to be a white middle-class professional woman in NYC. If you like Stuff White People Like you will *love* Another Bourgeois Dilemma.

4. I really enjoyed Andrew Heller’s insightful take on why summers in the old days were so much better than they are now at the Flint Journal. Of course, anyone who still references “Kick the Can” has my vote any day.

5. One of my favorite new (to me) blogs, Strangling My Muse, posted last week about the “To Don’t” list. God, do I need one of those…

6. Finally, for those of you who still pine for a mullet, here’s my look over at www.PoliticsDaily.com at Iran’s ban on Western haircuts. (My subtitle that was dropped: Last of the Mohawkans…pity.)

Oh yes and please do follow me on Twitter!

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you to some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. I’m a sucker for understated British humor. Here’s a hysterical post in The Guardian by the British actor/writer/comedian David Mitchell on the new toilet-paper free toilet.

2. Also funny is Stuff White People Like’s take on why white people like the World Cup.

3. For the avid readers out there, here are the top five children’s books for grown-ups from Brain Pickings. I’m especially fond of The Little Prince.

4. I haven’t seen Sex and The City 2 (nor do I plan to) but this scathing review at The Stranger made me laugh out loud. (Hat tip: Communicatrix.)

5. In light of my recent post on frugality, I loved this article in Mint about how to go on a date without breaking the bank. (Hat Tip: @urbanmusewriter who wrote it!)

6. Finally, in the Department of Cool, check out this video on Gimundo about what Los Angeles would look like without cars. (Hat tip: The Happiness Project)

And, as always, please do follow me on Twitter!

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you to some recommended reading around the blogosphere:

1. Further to my earlier discussion of renting vs. buying a home, here’s a very sober account of the whole American home owning dream by Matt Bai in The New York Times.

2. And further to my ongoing obsession with libraries, here’s a piece from Salon on the death of the library book.

3. Writers will love this mock set of submission guidelines from The Rumpus (via Erika at the Practicing Writing blog.)

4. And while all you under-employed writers are at it, have a look at some of the day jobs held by famous writers over at Lapham’s Quarterly. (Hat Tip: @lizzieskurnick.)

5. In department of funny, enjoy the latest installment from Stuff White People Like on “picking their own fruit.”

6. Finally, from the indefatigable Kim and Jason on the Escape Adulthood blog, here are 20 signs that you are living life to the fullest.

Have a great weekend.

Follow me on Twitter!

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

Every Friday I point you to some worthwhile reading around the blogosphere:

1. I absolutely adored this article by Virginia Heffernan about how the internet liberated women.

2. I was really moved by this interview on BBC’s Radio Four with a woman who learned that her father was a Commandant at Auschwitz. (Have I told you how much I love the BBC?)

3. On the humorous end of things, here’s a great post on Stuff White People Like about why White People prefer Conan over Jay.

4. This essay in The Huffington Post by Sarah Tomlinson about the new economy also made me laugh.

5. I was quite taken with some of the reactions to my post about recurrent dreams. Here’s a dictionary of dreams over at Smartgirl that I stumbled across while writing that post.

6. Finally, in the Department of Shameless Promotion, I wanted to share that an essay of mine entitled “Married to a Metrosexual” was published in the new edition of the Chicken Soup franchise, Chicken Soup For The Soul: True Love. (Sorry – you’ll need to buy that one!)
Follow me on Twitter.

Enjoy your weekend!

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl

Reluctant Soccer Mom

I had a formative cultural experience in London last night.

No, it didn’t entail that controversial new Damien Hirst exhibit over at the Wallace Collection. Nor did I catch that hot new production at the Donmar Warehouse. Nope. My cultural immersion was much more authentically British: I attended my first professional soccer game.

Today, I’m over at PoliticsDaily.com talking about the seminal role soccer plays in European life and how living here has changed my attitude towards the sport. Read it here

Image: Soccer Dude by Brit. via Flickr under a Creative Commons License.

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl

Tips For Adulthood: Five Books That Are Worth Re-Reading

Every Wednesday I offer tips for adulthood. Further to yesterday’s post about the pleasures of re-reading as an adult, I thought I’d make some suggestions about books that I think are worth a second read (or a first if you haven’t gotten to them yet!):

1. I Don’t Know How She Does It by Allison Pearson. Although some see this book as fanning the flames of the Mommy Wars (more on that tomorrow), I thought it was a terrifically funny – and moving – portrait of the over-stressed working mom. See yesterday for more on that one.

2. Disgrace by J. M. Coetzee. This is, in my opinion, a masterpiece and one of the very few novels I’ve read more than once (three times actually). It provides a stark, haunting portrait of a middle-aged man coping with disillusionment (both personal and professional), longing,  fatherhood, and masculinity…all set against the backdrop of a post-apartheid South Africa. Again, not everyone’s cup of tea – many people can’t stand the notoriously aloof Coetzee – but I discovered new layers of meaning with each additional read. I don’t always agree with the choices for Booker Prize, but this time I did (Winner: 1999).

3. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. It’s hard to believe that this is the only book that Lee ever wrote. I wouldn’t necessarily have chosen to re-read it – feeling I’d done my duty back in 9th grade when it was assigned in every freshman English class in the United States – but I re-read it in one of my book groups and was really glad that I did. In addition to all of the usual themes of childhood, race relations and the morality of violence, this book offers a glorious peek into the Depression-era American South.

4. We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver – This one may be more familiar to British readers, even though it is set in America.  It tells the story of a mother coming to terms with her psychopathic son. Like Disgrace, this is a pretty dark tale, so brace yourself before reading. I’ve only read it once but feel like it demands a second read.

5. Anything by Jane Austen.

*****

I am always drawn to the Stuff White People Like website, where the authors make fun of (upscale) white culture. Check out today’s entry on the Vespa Scooter.

Image: Jane Austen’s EMMA by Allie via Flickr under a Creative Commons Website.

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl