Tag Archives: Where The Wild Things Are

Networking in Adulthood: Dating For Friends…Online

One of the great things about blogging is that you get to read all this stuff you’d never come into contact with normally, simply because you are now paying attention to – say – adulthood. This past week, for example, I can’t tell you how many wonderful reviews I’ve read of the movie, Where The Wild Things Are, all of which talked about its appeal for grown-ups.

Another great thing about blogging is that you get to know (ok, e-know) all different kinds of people whom you’d never meet in real life. That connection might come about because they left a comment on your blog or started following you on Twitter. Or because you saw them interviewed on someone else’s blog and you decided to get in touch. Whatever the source, the social side of blogging is one if its many wonderful attractions.

It was through a combination of these two channels that I came to discover my new e-BFF, Sharon Hyman. I was scrolling through one of the many “search alerts” I routinely send out on topics like “adulthood” and “middle age,” when I came across an article in the Canadian National Post entitled Imposter Adults. Intrigued, I read on. It was all about Sharon’s reflections on the process of growing up. It read:

I always thought that being a grownup meant you had the external trappings of adulthood: marriage, kids, a mortgage, maybe even a driver’s licence! Of course, having none of these, I presumed I couldn’t possibly be seen as a proper adult in this society. I also figured that being a grown-up meant that you had conquered the hopeless insecurities and fears that derailed you in high school –again, something I have yet to achieve. With these thoughts in mind, I set out to discover if anyone really feels like a grown-up on the inside, and what the concept of grown-uphood really means.

Sound familiar?

I immediately went to Sharon’s website, Neverbloomers (subtitle: The Search For GrownUphood), where I found out that she’s actually making a movie about said topic. I watched the hysterically funny video on the front page of the website, which includes clips from some of her interviews for the film.

And then – because who am I to turn down a personality test when proferred? – I took the Neverbloomer “Have You Found Your Inner Adult Quiz?” (Needless to say, I haven’t, though I did receive the result “grown up in training” which sounded about right to me).

I promptly emailed Sharon to express my delight and appreciation at having found her website. The rest is history. We’re now “friends” on Facebook.

I once wrote a commentary for Chicago Public Radio about the elusive search for female friends in adulthood. The thrust of the piece was to illustrate – by example – what a nightmare it is to have to “date” for friends once you grow up and have kids. But in this brave new world where most community-building takes place online, that’s all gone now. And so, like millions of men and women before me – I’m now discovering the joys of online “dating”…for friends.

And what a joy it is.

*****

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Image: 42/365 Meet My Best Friend II by Leah Mancl via Flickr under a Creative Commons License.

Friday Pix: Recommended Reading For The Weekend

This Friday I point you to some worthwhile reading around the blogosphere:

1. If you missed this interview with Spike Jones, Dave Eggers and Maurice Sendak in Newsweek about the film version of that childhood classic, Where The Wild Things Are, it’s a must. Sendak is priceless!

2. One of my favorite new (to me) blogs is Katy Keim’s Book Snob. Her detailed and funny reviews make you want to leap out of your chair and buy them. On the strength of her latest review, I’ve already put The Last of Her Kind on my list.

3. Speaking of books, if you’ve ever tried selling a book to a publisher, you’ll love this send-up of where book marketing is at these days from the New Yorker. (Hat Tip: Help! I Need a Publisher.)

4. In honor of its 150th birthday, The British Psychological Society’s Reader’s Digest invited some of the world’s leading psychologists to share –  in 150 words –  one nagging thing that they still don’t understand about themselves. Brilliant! (Hat Tip: Freakonomics.)

5. If you haven’t seen it (and call still stomach reading anything about Roman Polanski), here’s Calvin Trillin’s hilarious satirical poem in The Nation.

6. Another beautiful meditation on middle age by Judith Warner in the New York Times. (Quick middle age quiz: What is her title a reference to?)

7. My take on what American Conservatives could learn from British Conservatives.

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